Utensils Needed for Canning and Preserving II

Strike the fruit on the bed of needles, and you have a dozen holes at once. When the work is finished, remove the cork from the board, wash and dry thoroughly. A little oil on the needles will prevent rusting. With needles of the size suggested there is little danger of the points breaking, but it is worth remembering that the use of pricking machines was abandoned in curing prunes on a commercial scale in California because the steel needles broke and remained in the fruit. A wooden vegetable masher is indispensable when making jellies and purees (fig. 4).

Canning Utensils

Canning Utensils

A sirup gauge and glass cylinder (fig. 5 A and B) are not essential to preserving, canning, and jelly making, but they are valuable aids in getting the right proportion of sugar for fruit or jelly. The sirup gauge costs about 50 cents and the cylinder about 25 cents. A lipped cylinder that holds a little over a gill is the best size. Small ironĀ rings, such as sometimes come off the hub of cart wheels, may be table masher, used instead of a tripod for slightly raising the preserving kettles from the hot stove or range.

To make a flannel straining bag, take a square piece of flannel (27 by 27 inches is a good size), fold it to make a three-cornered bag, stitch one of the sides, cut the top square across, bind the opening with strong, broad tape, stitch on this binding four tapes with which to tie the bag to a frame. To use this bag, tie it to a strong frame or to the backs of two kitchen chairs. If the chairs are used, place some heavy articles in them; or the bag may hang on a pole (a broom handle) which rests on the backs of the chairs. A high, stool turned upside down makes a good support for the bag. Put a bowl on the floor under the bag, then pour in the fruit juice, which will pass through comparatively clear. Before it is used the bag should be washed and boiled in clear water.

Here isĀ the original 1905 page:

Canning Utensils Three

Canning Utensils Three

Learn the basic steps to safely store and preserve your sauces and stock up for the winter.

Canning: Molds and Molding